Several issues are much more daunting than getting a National Security Agency (NSA) disclaimer and it’s precisely what happened to Microsoft earlier. The intelligence organization found a serious bug in Windows, and it was revealed immediately to Microsoft by the NSA’s engineers rather than harnessing the information to further their own purposes.

The bug in concern exists in crypt32.dll, a Microsoft framework that performs “Certificate and Cryptographic Messaging functions in the CryptoAPI,” according to the technology news site Krebson Security.

Krebs explains the CryptoAPI allows developers “to use encryption on protecting Windows-based software,” among other items. Crypt32.dll might encourage bad attackers to bypass authentication on malware if hacked, making viruses look credible while keeping far more unpleasant surprises within.

The website also states that a weakness in this feature may have a deleterious effect on the security of various Windows 10 features, including (but not limited to) Windows device and network safety, Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer internet-based, sensitive information authentication.

Although Krebs theorizes that this bug is likely to have negatively impacted “all versions of Windows” (crypt32.dll has been around since Windows ‘ early days), the NSA has only verified that Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016 have been compromised.

Moreover, Microsoft issued a score of one to the bug, which is the second-worst rating you might wish for as a customer.

That is the same threat refers to the critical flaw we face today. There is still a delay between how an update is released and when the security of computers around the world is successfully applied. Patches for the glaring problem have indeed popped out to compromised computers (whether you are a business client or a regular user). That is a window of time that hackers are seeking to exploit. Guidelines recommend you to frequently update your systems, so just be careful to check for the enhanced security modifications in the Software update.